Oktoberfest - ein Fest der Landeshauptstadt München

The Glückshafen

The success story of a lottery ticket

Play, fun, excitement, and doing something good. At the Glückshafen raffle, everyone can try their luck by buying a ticket. Pull a dud? That’s not so bad. The money will be donated to a good cause.

What’s special: at the Wiesn for over 200 years!

Affordable for almost everyone today with a lot price of €1.00, the Glückshafen was born in 1816 from charity to the poor. A famine made things difficult for people to get by, so a raffle was organized. The idea was simple and endures today: With a small stake you have the chance to get something higher – the profit. And if it doesn’t work out, at least you’ve donated your efforts to a good cause. To this day, the Glückshafen is operated by the Red Cross. It’s the oldest company on the Wiesn!

Games, fun, and excitement for young and old

The Glückshafen is directly behind the main Oktoberfest entrance, on the left side. You can also recognize the stand by the fact that it’s mostly surrounded by people. For children especially, it’s exciting to buy a ticket and then open it, full of excitement. Did you pull a dud, or does it have a winning number? The lucky winners then exchange them for large stuffed animals, comic figures, or toys. The proceeds of the Glückshafen are distributed to various institutions in Munich and the surrounding area, including youth welfare services, geriatric care, and other social institutions.

The Glückshafen for backseat drivers: royal affair

In the 19th century, students made lots out of paper and the main prizes were silver, porcelain, and jewelry. Stockings, pipe bowls, or small portraits of the king served as consolation prizes. In bad years the royal family were particularly charitable, and bought large quantities of the small lots to distribute among the needy.

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The official Oktoberfest App with site plan, tent filling levels and lots of news and information about the Wiesn